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CURTISS Warhawk (N80FR)
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CURTISS Warhawk (N80FR)

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ian mcdonell
spectacular shot thanks
Paul Wisgerhof
O.K., the paint jobs indicate pre-WWII designs, but what are they?
Champdriver
Both are Curtiss designs, the left one is a 1941 P-40C and on the right is a 1939 P-36C.
Both are part of the Fighter Collection.
Beautiful photo of two classics.

http://fighter-collection.com/cft/
jcsentellsr
Yes, Jim. I think you are right on target---since that was what
I had identified them as well, though
I could not nail down the year or exact model.
But what were the conditions that created this terrific photo opportunity? Is Curtiss still even in this business? That is, it seems unlikely to have been a corporate promo.
Eric Nelson
Mulitaircraft prop sync :-)
Roy Hunte
Beautiful shot!
Joseph Immermann
Beautiful! I did not realize there were any of the earlier model P-40s left (two .50s in the nose and two on each wing, as opposed to the later three on each wing). Nice shot!
Thomas DPhoto Uploader
The photo was shot during the Flying Legends Air Show 2016 at Duxford, UK
cliff731
These two Curtiss-Wright aircraft have lit up the comments here. I've always thought the P-36 illustrated well the lineage that led to the P-40 design. To answer jcsentellsr, yes... Curtiss-Wright is still in business, although no longer manufacturing aircraft. The company sold its aircraft division to North American Aviation in the late 1940's.
Brian Mortin
Here's some info on the subject:
There is a post in this thread that shines some light on where it came from, though there aren't any details as to how much was there to begin with at the start of the project: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=55766&hilit=planes+of+fame&start=15

This is last Curtiss P-36C constructed Serial No. 38-210. Built in 1939 and delivered to Selfridge Field, Michigan in May 1939. She participated in the 1939 Cleveland Air Races in September 1939 with experimental camouflage.
She participated in the War Games at Maxwell Field following the Air Races.
She was sent to Wright Patterson for testing in 1940 and then on to serve with several different squadrons on the U.S. East Coast.
In 1942 she was sent to Chanute Technical Training Command for a few months, thereafter she was labeled obsolete and flown to Buckley field in Colorado.
She was put into a Tech School following her decommission and was later acquired by a Pratt & Whitney Tech instructor from Canada, where she resided until a Florida collector acquired it and passed her on to The Fighter Collection more than a decade ago.
The restoration commenced some four years ago, under the leadership of Matt Nightingale at Chino, California when sufficient original parts capable of overhaul were recovered to ensure that the aircraft could be completed to fly. Steve Hinton carried out the shakedown flights and the FAA certified P-36C made it first public appearances at the 2015 Planes of Fame Airshow, in unique flights with the Museum’s Sikorsky P-35 in similar markings.

Matt Nightingale's shop, California Aerofab, which did the restoration of this aircraft, was also of course responsible for the restoration of TFC's Hawk 75 (French/export P-36), as well as both the P-40B that TFC used to own and the P-40C they currently own. A lot of talent and expertise in the early Hawks.
Brian Mortin
There is a post in this thread that shines some light on where it came from, though there aren't any details as to how much was there to begin with at the start of the project: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=55766&hilit=planes+of+fame&start=15

This is last Curtiss P-36C constructed Serial No. 38-210. Built in 1939 and delivered to Selfridge Field, Michigan in May 1939. She participated in the 1939 Cleveland Air Races in September 1939 with experimental camouflage.
She participated in the War Games at Maxwell Field following the Air Races.
She was sent to Wright Patterson for testing in 1940 and then on to serve with several different squadrons on the U.S. East Coast.
In 1942 she was sent to Chanute Technical Training Command for a few months, thereafter she was labeled obsolete and flown to Buckley field in Colorado.
She was put into a Tech School following her decommission and was later acquired by a Pratt & Whitney Tech instructor from Canada, where she resided until a Florida collector acquired it and passed her on to The Fighter Collection more than a decade ago.
The restoration commenced some four years ago, under the leadership of Matt Nightingale at Chino, California when sufficient original parts capable of overhaul were recovered to ensure that the aircraft could be completed to fly. Steve Hinton carried out the shakedown flights and the FAA certified P-36C made it first public appearances at the 2015 Planes of Fame Airshow, in unique flights with the Museum’s Sikorsky P-35 in similar markings.

Matt Nightingale's shop, California Aerofab, which did the restoration of this aircraft, was also of course responsible for the restoration of TFC's Hawk 75 (French/export P-36), as well as both the P-40B that TFC used to own and the P-40C they currently own. A lot of talent and expertise in the early Hawks.
John Turanin
What a perfect comparative illustration of evolutionary aircraft design of a/c in flight. Tails are identical. Wings appear so as well. But note the accommodation of the inline engine, more slender front fuselage, and improved canopy. Beautiful. Too bad evolutionary changes were needed to surpass Axis a/c even in the early 40s. But Curtiss surely delivered!
गतिविधि लॉग
क्या आप 1998 से N80FR के लिए पूरा इतिहास खोज चाहते हैं? अभी खरीदें। एक घंटे में इसे पायें।
दिनांक जहाज मूल गंतव्य स्थान प्रस्थान आगमन अवधि
No Recent History Data
रजिस्टर्ड यूजर (रजिस्टर करना नि:शुल्क और आसान है!) 3 months इतिहास देखें जुड़ें
 

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